What Is Private Mortgage Insurance

Dated: 07/26/2017

Views: 343


Private mortgage insurance, or PMI: Just the basics


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If your down payment on a home is less than 20%, you will have to pay for mortgage insurance, [unless you’re qualified for a VA loan.]


What is PMI?

When you make a down payment of less than 20%, the lender requires private mortgage insurance, or PMI. The policy protects the lender from losing money if you end up in foreclosure. PMI also is required if you refinance the mortgage with less than 20% equity.


Private mortgage insurance fees vary, depending on the size of the down payment and your credit score, from around 0.3% to about 1.5% of the original loan amount per year. Some years, PMI premiums are tax-deductible and some years they're not, depending upon the whim of Congress.


How Mortgage Insurance is Calculated:

Insurance rate

0.41% per year*

Loan amount

$180,000

Annual premium

$738

Monthly premium:

$61.50


Peyton buys a $200,000 house and makes a 10% down payment, borrowing $180,000.

Peyton has a 740 credit score.


*Rate varies according to size of down payment, credit score and insurer.


Source: Bankrate.com, Radian mortgage insurance calculator


Most PMI policies require the borrower to pay monthly. Borrowers also have the option of paying for mortgage insurance with a large upfront payment.


PMI can be canceled

Your lender must automatically cancel PMI when your outstanding loan balance drops to 78% of the home's original value. This probably will take several years.


You can speed up the cancellation of mortgage insurance by keeping track of your payments. Once the loan balance reaches 80% of the home's original value, you may ask the lender to discontinue the mortgage insurance premiums.


To put it another way: You can request cancellation of mortgage insurance when the loan-to-value ratio drops to 80%. The lender is required to cancel private mortgage insurance when the loan-to-value ratio drops to 78%.


Loan-to-value ratio


The loan-to-value ratio, or LTV, describes mortgage debt as a percentage of how much the home is worth. It is a financial term used by lenders.

Formula: Mortgage amount owed / Appraised value

Example: Alex owes $60,000 on the mortgage. The house is worth $100,000.

$60,000 mortgage balance / $100,000 = 0.60. This means that Alex's loan-to-value ratio is 60%.


We're talking PMI, not FHA


Recent FHA-insured loans require payment of mortgage insurance premiums for the life of the loan. FHA mortgage insurance premiums can't be canceled. Instead, you have to refinance the loan. Read "7 crucial facts about FHA loans."


Source


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Mark Ross

For Mark Ross, founder of Ross NW Real Estate and professional real estate broker, real estate has always been the career of choice. During his 25+ years in the industry, Mark has gained experience in....

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